Matt Battin, Architect

Matt Battin is the principal of Urban Density Lab and a FEMA consultant

As an architect, designer, maker and nomad, the notion of compact mobile housing has interested me for quite a while.  Be it prefab, site built, or mobile; efficient housing makes sense.  My architectural practice, Urban Density Lab, is focused on expanding the urban experience through unique design and innovative problem solving, rather than a cramped alternative to suburban-style housing.

My first experience of a “tiny” house was at the age of 9 when my family moved from a typical Victorian house in inner city Cleveland, OH to a 14’ x 18’ stone cabin with no running water or electricity in the Adirondack Mountains in New York.  The house was a single room living space with a loft area broken into 2 rooms running down half the house. We were a family of 5, so a second sleeping loft was added for me and my brother to share. For three years, 5 of us and a dog and a cat lived in under 400 square feet.

Informed by my living situation while young, I have since explored many components of small domestic projects. As a student in grad school, I worked with the Solar Decathlon team to design, construct and relocate a small house from Michigan to the National Mall in Washington DC.  While the project took on multiple agendas, we set out to create a prototype that would inform future production of the house, thinking about opportunities to exploit digital fabrication, mass customization, as well as off-the-shelf systems. As faculty I led a design studio working on a narrow house project.  Moreover, I have explored compact living through personal projects like my renovation of a ’74 Airstream Land Yacht travel trailer.  

In addition to projects relating to small domestic spaces, I also have extensive experience in federal policy related to disaster recovery and housing.  I look forward to advancing the exploration and design of the “tiny house” through my background in design, building technology, mobile domestic systems, “green” systems and materials knowledge.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s